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HOME | SIXTH FORM | ACADEMIC | Mathematics

Mathematics

Examination Board Edexcel

Primarily you should study this subject if you have enjoyed Mathematics up to IGCSE level. It is a challenging but interesting subject that not only builds on the work you will have met at IGCSE, but also involves new ideas that some of the greatest minds of the millennium have produced. The courses offered serve as very useful support for many other A-level subjects (e.g. Economics, Physics, Geography, Psychology, Biology and Business Studies), as well as leading to sought-after qualifications for the workplace and courses in higher education (particularly Engineering, Physics and Economics).

You will be working without a calculator for much of the time and it is important that your numerical and algebraic skills are of a very high standard. You will need to enjoy problem-solving and be prepared to persevere when solutions are not obvious.

Mathematics at AS and A-level is divided between Pure Maths and Applied Maths, with two thirds of the study being devoted to the Pure Mathematics content.

In Year 12, three modules are studied; the two Pure Mathematics ones being compulsory with the third, Applied module being an elective.

In Year 13, the structure is the same, with the two Pure Mathematics modules being compulsory and the third, Applied module an elective.

Pure Mathematics (Core Maths)

At this level you will be extending your knowledge of such topics as Algebra and Trigonometry, as well as learning some brand new ideas such as calculus and logarithms. There is a balance between the development of new ideas as an end in itself, and the emergence of these ideas in the solution of actual problems. A concept that appears at first sight rather abstract often has a surprisingly powerful role to play in the solution to a real-world problem, and likewise mathematical ideas developed in the solution of a problem can acquire a fascinating life of their own outside the context of the original problem. It is the balance between these approaches that provides so much of the intrigue and creativity in the study of Pure Mathematics.

Applied Mathematics

At School level, Applied Mathematics is divided between the areas of Mechanics, Statistics and Decision Mathematics.

Mechanics

In Mechanics you will learn how to describe mathematically the motion of objects and how they respond to forces acting upon them, from cars in the street to satellites revolving around a planet. You will learn mathematical modelling; that is, how to turn a complicated physical problem into a simpler one that can be analysed and solved using mathematical techniques.

In the AS Mechanics module (M1), sophisticated mathematical ideas such as calculus and vectors are used to describe simplified mechanical situations and Newton’s laws of motion are used to analyse them and make predictions about their future behaviour. The A2 Mechanics module (M2) is an extension of these ideas, and gives a taste of the structure of more advanced mathematical modelling, where concepts are introduced because they turn out to be very helpful rather than obviously necessary.

The two Mechanics modules are an excellent choice for girls studying Physics at A-level, and also for those wishing to pursue further study in Physics or Structural/Mechanical Engineering beyond the Sixth Form.

Statistics

In Statistics you will learn how to analyse and summarise numerical data in order to arrive at conclusions about it, such as judging whether an observed pattern in an experiment could most likely be attributable to coincidence, or whether it is perhaps a reflection of some underlying relationship. You will extend the work begun for IGCSE by using new mathematical techniques studied in the Pure Mathematics course.

In the AS level module (S1), topics such as Probability Distributions, Correlation and Regression and the Theory of Probability are developed, while in the A2 module (S2), this work is extended to cover more sophisticated distributions and continuous Random Variables.

The Statistics modules are helpful for any girl wishing to pursue further study of the Life Sciences, Psychology or Economics beyond the Sixth Form.

Decision Mathematics

In Year 13 girls get the option to study a module in Decision Mathematics (D1). This is a very modern branch of the subject and covers ideas such as how to order alphabetically or numerically large amounts of data (and how to judge the relative efficiency of these methods), how best to traverse a network series of different places and how to maximise business profits subject to constraints such as the availability of raw materials and labour costs. This module gives a taste of the kind of reasoning and mathematical ideas that would be encountered in the further study of Computer Science or Operational Research beyond the Sixth Form.

Further Mathematics

Examination Board Edexcel

Further Mathematics can only be studied in addition to Mathematics, so it requires girls to devote two of their AS option choices to the subject area, one choice being Mathematics, the other choice being Further Mathematics.

Full details of the Mathematics course can be found in the relevant section and should be read first, before continuing with this section.

Mathematics and Further Mathematics is an option combination that girls who wish to study Mathematics at university should seriously consider following (although it is not necessarily a prerequisite for such study), as should anyone wishing to study Maths, Physics, Engineering or Economics at the very top universities.

It is a demanding course of study that requires a capacity for abstract reasoning as well as very strong algebraic skills, However, it is highly rewarding for those who choose to pursue it.

Girls studying the single-subject Mathematics option must complete six modules by the end of Year 13: the four compulsory Pure modules and two elective Applied ones. In both of Years 12 and 13 this study is completed over four lessons per week, with two different teachers.

During both Year 12 and Year 13, girls choosing the Mathematics and Further Mathematics options will receive eight lessons per week, delivered by four different teachers, and complete six modules in each year. This is exactly double the amount of teaching time, and twice the number of modules studied.

During Year 12, girls choosing the Mathematics and Further Mathematics options study three of the four Pure Mathematics modules that are compulsory for the single Mathematics award. They will also study the AS Statistics (S1) and the AS Mechanics (M1) modules. The sixth module studied is the Further Pure Mathematics 1 module, which explores some more unusual concepts and ideas (such as Matrices and Complex numbers) that are not covered anywhere in the single-subject syllabus. This module is an AS level one, and is not necessarily harder than the other AS pure modules.

During Year 13, girls must complete another six modules, one of which is the remaining Pure Module that is necessary for the single-subject course, another of which is Further Pure Mathematics 2, a more advanced Pure Maths module in which the mathematics gets considerably more sophisticated and difficult, and more interesting! The remaining four modules required for the Further Maths A2 qualification are elective (from M2, M3, S2, S3, FP3, D1, D2), and we are able to deliver almost any combination of Applied modules that a girl may wish to follow.

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HOME | SIXTH FORM | ACADEMIC | Mathematics

Mathematics

Examination Board Edexcel

Primarily you should study this subject if you have enjoyed Mathematics up to IGCSE level. It is a challenging but interesting subject that not only builds on the work you will have met at IGCSE, but also involves new ideas that some of the greatest minds of the millennium have produced. The courses offered serve as very useful support for many other A-level subjects (e.g. Economics, Physics, Geography, Psychology, Biology and Business Studies), as well as leading to sought-after qualifications for the workplace and courses in higher education (particularly Engineering, Physics and Economics).

You will be working without a calculator for much of the time and it is important that your numerical and algebraic skills are of a very high standard. You will need to enjoy problem-solving and be prepared to persevere when solutions are not obvious.

Mathematics at AS and A-level is divided between Pure Maths and Applied Maths, with two thirds of the study being devoted to the Pure Mathematics content.

In Year 12, three modules are studied; the two Pure Mathematics ones being compulsory with the third, Applied module being an elective.

In Year 13, the structure is the same, with the two Pure Mathematics modules being compulsory and the third, Applied module an elective.

Pure Mathematics (Core Maths)

At this level you will be extending your knowledge of such topics as Algebra and Trigonometry, as well as learning some brand new ideas such as calculus and logarithms. There is a balance between the development of new ideas as an end in itself, and the emergence of these ideas in the solution of actual problems. A concept that appears at first sight rather abstract often has a surprisingly powerful role to play in the solution to a real-world problem, and likewise mathematical ideas developed in the solution of a problem can acquire a fascinating life of their own outside the context of the original problem. It is the balance between these approaches that provides so much of the intrigue and creativity in the study of Pure Mathematics.

Applied Mathematics

At School level, Applied Mathematics is divided between the areas of Mechanics, Statistics and Decision Mathematics.

Mechanics

In Mechanics you will learn how to describe mathematically the motion of objects and how they respond to forces acting upon them, from cars in the street to satellites revolving around a planet. You will learn mathematical modelling; that is, how to turn a complicated physical problem into a simpler one that can be analysed and solved using mathematical techniques.

In the AS Mechanics module (M1), sophisticated mathematical ideas such as calculus and vectors are used to describe simplified mechanical situations and Newton’s laws of motion are used to analyse them and make predictions about their future behaviour. The A2 Mechanics module (M2) is an extension of these ideas, and gives a taste of the structure of more advanced mathematical modelling, where concepts are introduced because they turn out to be very helpful rather than obviously necessary.

The two Mechanics modules are an excellent choice for girls studying Physics at A-level, and also for those wishing to pursue further study in Physics or Structural/Mechanical Engineering beyond the Sixth Form.

Statistics

In Statistics you will learn how to analyse and summarise numerical data in order to arrive at conclusions about it, such as judging whether an observed pattern in an experiment could most likely be attributable to coincidence, or whether it is perhaps a reflection of some underlying relationship. You will extend the work begun for IGCSE by using new mathematical techniques studied in the Pure Mathematics course.

In the AS level module (S1), topics such as Probability Distributions, Correlation and Regression and the Theory of Probability are developed, while in the A2 module (S2), this work is extended to cover more sophisticated distributions and continuous Random Variables.

The Statistics modules are helpful for any girl wishing to pursue further study of the Life Sciences, Psychology or Economics beyond the Sixth Form.

Decision Mathematics

In Year 13 girls get the option to study a module in Decision Mathematics (D1). This is a very modern branch of the subject and covers ideas such as how to order alphabetically or numerically large amounts of data (and how to judge the relative efficiency of these methods), how best to traverse a network series of different places and how to maximise business profits subject to constraints such as the availability of raw materials and labour costs. This module gives a taste of the kind of reasoning and mathematical ideas that would be encountered in the further study of Computer Science or Operational Research beyond the Sixth Form.

Further Mathematics

Examination Board Edexcel

Further Mathematics can only be studied in addition to Mathematics, so it requires girls to devote two of their AS option choices to the subject area, one choice being Mathematics, the other choice being Further Mathematics.

Full details of the Mathematics course can be found in the relevant section and should be read first, before continuing with this section.

Mathematics and Further Mathematics is an option combination that girls who wish to study Mathematics at university should seriously consider following (although it is not necessarily a prerequisite for such study), as should anyone wishing to study Maths, Physics, Engineering or Economics at the very top universities.

It is a demanding course of study that requires a capacity for abstract reasoning as well as very strong algebraic skills, However, it is highly rewarding for those who choose to pursue it.

Girls studying the single-subject Mathematics option must complete six modules by the end of Year 13: the four compulsory Pure modules and two elective Applied ones. In both of Years 12 and 13 this study is completed over four lessons per week, with two different teachers.

During both Year 12 and Year 13, girls choosing the Mathematics and Further Mathematics options will receive eight lessons per week, delivered by four different teachers, and complete six modules in each year. This is exactly double the amount of teaching time, and twice the number of modules studied.

During Year 12, girls choosing the Mathematics and Further Mathematics options study three of the four Pure Mathematics modules that are compulsory for the single Mathematics award. They will also study the AS Statistics (S1) and the AS Mechanics (M1) modules. The sixth module studied is the Further Pure Mathematics 1 module, which explores some more unusual concepts and ideas (such as Matrices and Complex numbers) that are not covered anywhere in the single-subject syllabus. This module is an AS level one, and is not necessarily harder than the other AS pure modules.

During Year 13, girls must complete another six modules, one of which is the remaining Pure Module that is necessary for the single-subject course, another of which is Further Pure Mathematics 2, a more advanced Pure Maths module in which the mathematics gets considerably more sophisticated and difficult, and more interesting! The remaining four modules required for the Further Maths A2 qualification are elective (from M2, M3, S2, S3, FP3, D1, D2), and we are able to deliver almost any combination of Applied modules that a girl may wish to follow.

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